Factors associated with low fruit and vegetable consumption among people with severe mental ill health

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Severe mental ill health (SMI) is associated with excess mortality, and poor diet is one associated modifiable risk factor. This study investigated factors associated with low consumption of fruit and vegetables among people with SMI (N = 9914). A total of 8.4% of participants ate no portions per day, while only 15% ate 5 + portions. Individuals who never consumed fruit and vegetables or ate < 5 portions per day were more likely to be male, younger than 65, unemployed, experience poorer general health, or perceive health as unimportant. Poor diet is common among people with SMI and tailored dietary improvement interventions are required.

References: Lorimer, B., Traviss-Turner, G., Hill, A. et al. Factors associated with low fruit and vegetable consumption among people with severe mental ill health. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol (2023).

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Ben Lorimer

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