Objectively-measured sedentary time and physical activity in a bi-ethnic sample of young children: variation by socio-demographic, temporal and perinatal factors

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Background

Evidence suggests that South Asian school-aged children and adults are less active compared to the white British population. It is unknown if this generalises to young children. We aimed to describe variability in levels of physical activity and sedentary time in a bi-ethnic sample of young children from a deprived location.

Methods

This observational study included 202 South Asian and 140 white British children aged 1.5 to 5y, who provided 3181 valid days of triaxial accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+). Variability in sedentary time and physical activity levels were analysed by linear multilevel modelling. Logistic multilevel regression was used to identify factors associated with physical inactivity (failing to perform ≥180 min of total physical activity including ≥60 min moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day).

Results

There were no significant ethnic differences in the overall levels of behaviours; South Asian and white British children spent half of daily time sedentary, just over 40% in light physical activity, and the remaining 7.5 to 8% of time in MVPA. Sedentary time was lower and physical activity levels were higher in older children, and levels of MVPA and vector magnitude counts per minute (CPM) were higher on weekends compared to weekdays. In South Asian children, sedentary time was lower on weekends. Sedentary time was lower and physical activity levels were higher in spring compared to winter in white British children, and in all seasons compared to winter in South Asian children. South Asian children born at high birth weight performed more MVPA, and in both ethnicities there was some evidence that children with older mothers were more sedentary and less active. Sedentary time was higher and light physical activity was lower in South Asian children in the highest compared to the lowest income families. South Asian girls performed less MVPA, registered fewer vector magnitude CPM, and were 3.5 times more likely to be physically inactive than South Asian boys.

Conclusions

Sedentary time and physical activity levels vary by socio-demographic, temporal and perinatal characteristics in young children from a deprived location. South Asian girls have the most to gain from efforts to increase physical activity levels.

References: Collings, P.J., Dogra, S.A., Costa, S. et al. Objectively-measured sedentary time and physical activity in a bi-ethnic sample of young children: variation by socio-demographic, temporal and perinatal factors. BMC Public Health 20, 109 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-8132-z

Details:

Author(s):

Collings, P.J., Dogra, S.A., Costa, S, Bingham D, Barber S.E.

Lead for Communities & Implementation Research

Lead for Physical Activity Research

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