Resources: Blogs

Recovery contexts, not outcomes: An alternative way to evaluate non-clinical interventions for serious mental illness

Relying on outcome measures to determine if an intervention can aid recovery from serious mental illness, is a fallacy. Outcome measures simplify a complex and personal experience, and are hard to predict, particularly within non-clinical community interventions. Yet intervention efficacy is often dependant on such measures, determining access to funding and even access to services. Given that establishing a context for recovery is within the control of facilitators, intervention contexts present an alternative approach to evaluating intervention success.

What are the benefits when health and social care staff get involved in applied health research?

Back in 2019, we wrote our first blog about the potential benefits for staff getting involved in applied health research with colleagues from the Yorkshire and Humber Patient Safety Translational Research Centre

Taking Steps Towards Equality, Diversity, and Inclusion in Yorkshire & Humber ARC Research

We want all people and communities in YH to benefit from our research. To do this we aim to follow best practice and have the highest standards of equality, diversity and inclusion in all our research. The NIHR Applied Research Collaborations (ARCs) are leading efforts to put the latest NIHR Equality Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Strategy into practice within their research programs. Some ARCs have developed toolkits while others have developed strategies focused on "mainstreaming" EDI.

Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) on a pain and frailty study – reflections on involvement, engagement, and impact 

The The YH ARC supported Pain in Older People with Frailty (POPPY) Study is a 3-year NIHR-funded study hosted by Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (commenced April 2022). The study aims to provide service guidance to improve access and support for older adults living with frailty to better manage their pain.

Implementation researchers’ perspectives on bridging the research-practice gap

In our blog earlier this year, we talked about simplifying implementation science, and making it more accessible to frontline staff. In this blog we will share critical insights that the implementation team, based at the Improvement Academy, has gathered while supporting, and facilitating putting evidence into practice.

We need a more realistic approach to implementation in healthcare (Part 1)

The basic origins of implementation science have always been a push approach. We as implementation researchers find and know the evidence-based practices that ‘need’ to be implemented. We tell health systems, hospitals, schools, communities, and clinics about these interventions. We ask them if they want to engage with us in a clinical trial or implementation trial. If they agree, funding is provided externally or internally, local managers and their teams are informed that the project is happening, researchers are funded to learn about the implementation, and the executives and policy makers who gave the green light expect findings that tell them how to scale up these interventions. Implementation begins and most pilots are usually pretty successful.

We need a more realistic approach to implementation in healthcare (Part 2)

There are a lot of people post Covid, and a lot of practitioners who are traumatised. In my field of work this was most evident on ICU wards. There is also the idea of traumatised systems. Data has shown how hard these systems were before Covid and the moral injury that practitioners experience in the service settings. Unfortunately, there’s just not enough in the literature and the big implementation science journals and conferences which talk about these burnouts and these traumas.

Gypsy and Traveller-led Research Partnerships: Reaching Out

As part of our PPIE and Co-Production focus in December, our Co-Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement Lead, Christine Smith, shares a blog about The Reaching Out Initiative. This important project was born from a vision to bridge gaps and foster meaningful relationships between Gypsy and Traveller Communities (GTC) in Yorkshire and Humber and researchers from the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR). This initiative aimed to encourage the development of new public involvement relationships and more inclusive approaches to community engagement, based on community development principles.

Securing the future of child health and development: evaluating what works in the early years using a novel interventional family cohort study.

Early childhood provides the building blocks for a child's future, but there isn't enough research evidence about how to best support their parents during this time. In this blog, Kate Mooney describes how the BSB Innovation hub are planning to evaluate a series of early years interventions, providing evidence on how to give every child the best possible start in life."

Getting young people involved in research on the things that matter to them – What can we do? #WorldMentalHealthDay2023

There is a gap in understanding and knowledge of methods for meaningfully involving and engaging with children and young people in matters and decisions that impact on them.

The perinatal mental health ‘blind spot’: recommendations to improve routine data 

Data from health records could help us understand the scale of the mental health needs of women during the perinatal period at the local level and identify groups who might be being missed. Publicly available health data is a free and accessible tool for exploring the prevalence of perinatal mental health difficulties. However, we found substantive limitations with all sources of this data, making it impossible to produce accurate estimates of perinatal mental health need and explore inequalities in assessment and access to support.

Overflow in Urgent Care: Are Non-Urgent Patients the Culprit?

Read about the research we conducted to try to answer this question by using a detailed dataset, the Emergency Care Dataset (ECDS), and how we tried to understand the post-pandemic urgent care attendance trends.